Linda O’Keefe, Victim In A 45-Year-Old Cold Case Starts ‘Tweeting’

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Blonde and blue-eyed Linda Ann O’ Keefe could have been your everyday middle-aged mom in this day and age just learning how to use Twitter, if only she hadn’t been brutally murdered in 1973 at the age of 11.

But Newport Police in California are bringing attention back into what was once a cold case by bringing Linda to ‘life,’ releasing a series of tweets on Saturday that were from the perspective of the little girl.

On July 6, 1973, Linda was walking home from school when she was kidnapped, and her body found at a nearby nature reserve with strangulation marks.

The series of tweets, now compiled under #LindasStory detail the start of what had unfortunately been her last day alive. It began when she said her mother couldn’t pick her up from school that day, and she had to take the short walk home.

“No one is concerned when I don’t come home from school right away. Or not TOO concerned, anyway,” reads one post written in Linda’s voice. “It’s a different time back in 1973, and kids roam the neighborhood on their bikes for hours at a time.”

Linda’s parents and her 18 year old sister then start calling for her, rousing friends and family for a search in the area.

The details of how a bicyclist who found her as he was looking for frogs among cattail plants in the nature reserve is even more chilling when you remember to read the tweets in the voice of the child.

“He sees something small, and pale. My hand. He sees my hand,” the tweet reads. “He screams, trying to rouse me,” recounted the tweet, and then how his companions rush to his screams, and they find her body.”

“They don’t know who I am, of course … or who I was,” the tweet says. “But they see a young girl’s body, still in my mom’s homemade dress. I’ve been strangled.”

Along with the story, Newport Police also released facial reconstruction images that predict what Linda’s suspected killer might look like now, based on DNA evidence collected at the time.


The police department said they were dedicated to give justice for Linda, and embracing new technologies like Twitter to drum up interest with the public, who might be able to provide more information especially if they were from the area or knew about the case back in the 70s.
You may view the complete series of tweets here:

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